Attention is a Valuable and Limited Resource

One of the personal resources that’s easy to take for granted is attention. That is, what you’re looking at or thinking about at a given moment. And in today’s information age, attention is a valuable resource. Marketers are constantly trying to grab your notice through commercials, billboards, pop-up ads, and product placement. The research on attention is actually pretty cool. Some of my favorite findings are:

  1. Babies use their attention (where they are looking or if they are looking) to help regulate (control) themselves. Ever see a baby fall asleep in a really noisy place? They are overwhelmed with stimulation and sleep is a way to control that. So is looking away from that loud stranger who has gotten too close.
  2. The key problem in ADHD is that children can’t keep their attention from being distracted. This is known as “inhibition.” Whereas children without ADHD are able to ignore distractions, like someone coming into their classroom or a noise going on in the other room, a child with ADHD can’t help but react. Even if that means they get in trouble!
  3. When we learn something new like driving, reading, or tying shoes, our attention is fully focused. We can’t do anything else. Likewise, when we do something challenging, like driving in traffic, reading in fuzzy font, or figuring out our new Smartphone, our attention is fully focused–and again, we can’t do anything else.
  4. Learning something new is often frustrating. When learning a new task, people’s thoughts and attention tend to be negative. E.g., “I don’t like this,” “This is hard,” “I’m never going to get this,” and other downers like that. But the cool part is, the better you get at the task, the less likely you are to have those negative thoughts. The key is to make it past that first, tough part.
  5. Just like babies, children and adults can refocus their attention to regulate or improve their mood. If their friend takes away a toy, a 5-year-old who immediately finds a new toy to happily play with is going to have less trouble in kindergarten than a 5-year-old who strikes out and becomes angry. Likewise, an adult who can “focus on the positive” (ick-phrase, but true) after a setback has better mental health.

Last night, at Torn Space Theater’s surreal production of They Kill Things, I used my attention to regulate my fear. There were lots of creepy situations, and in an everyday environment, I would have freaked out if a bulky masked man walked up to me and looked closely at my hands. Or if a group of masked maidens dressed in white rags wrapped a May pole while chanting.

Maypole Maidens | photo by C. E. Cameron

But I was in Silo City, a converted industrial site. The environment was so amazing and so different from anything I’d ever experienced, that I could move on from feeling scared immediately, simply by refocusing my attention on something else.

Silo City | photo by C. E. Cameron

Obviously there are times when it won’t work to refocus attention. There are plenty of situations that demand your full attention, for safety, or learning an important lesson, for example. But awareness of attention as a resource has definitely helped me in certain situations. Even outdoor interactive theater productions.

3 comments

  1. Mary CameronMitchell

    Just read your latest post about attention. I like the topic and enjoyed your insights. It is certainly true that marketers are always vying for our attention. I find it particularly annoying that I am baited to try to save a quarter or a buck by paying attention to a promotion and then keeping track of it. Something is out of whack here. It is actually alienating, which I doubt is the goal.

    Dad will be home soon. Roscoe and I have had a day at home doing stuff around the house, both inside and out. It is a lovely sunny, summery day here. Hope you are enjoying the same. Love, Mom

  2. Mary CameronMitchell

    Just read your latest post about attention. I like the topic and enjoyed your insights. It is certainly true that marketers are always vying for our attention. I find it particularly annoying that I am baited to try to save a quarter or a buck by paying attention to a promotion and then keeping track of it. Something is out of whack here. It is actually alienating, which I doubt is the goal.

    On Sat, Aug 22, 2015 at 3:45 PM, Mary CameronMitchell wrote:

    > Just read your latest post about attention. I like the topic and enjoyed > your insights. It is certainly true that marketers are always vying for our > attention. I find it particularly annoying that I am baited to try to save > a quarter or a buck by paying attention to a promotion and then keeping > track of it. Something is out of whack here. It is actually alienating, > which I doubt is the goal. > > Dad will be home soon. Roscoe and I have had a day at home doing stuff > around the house, both inside and out. It is a lovely sunny, summery day > here. Hope you are enjoying the same. Love, Mom > > On Sat, Aug 22, 2015 at 12:23 PM, c. e. cameron <

  3. Pingback: Automaticity in Everyday Life | c. e. cameron

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